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 ARSENIC VIOLATIONS Minimize

PWS 1590001) / CO

 

                                                 Notice of Drinking Water Arsenic Violation

                                                               Mandatory Public Notification Language

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has notified the CITY OF STANTON water system that the drinking water being supplied to customers had exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for ARSENIC.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) has established the MCL for ARSENIC at 0.010 mg/L, and has determined that it is a health concern at levels above the MCL.  Analysis of drinking water in your community for ARSENIC indicates a level of 0.011 mg/L.  This violation occurred in quarter four 2017 for EP002

This is not an emergency.  However, some people who drink water containing arsenic in excess of the MCL over many years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer. You do not need to use an alternative water supply.  However, if you have health concerns, you may want to talk to your doctor to get more information about how this may affect you.

You do not need to use an alternative water supply.  However, if you have health concerns, you may want to talk to your doctor to get more information about how this may affect you.

Steps to Correct the Problem:

Blend surface water and ground water to reduce levels below maximum contamination levels.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).  You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

Contact Information:

JESSIE MONTEZ

432-756-3302

Post/Delivery on: December 18, 2017

 

Public Notification Instructions

1.       Fill in your Public Water System ID#.

2.      Fill in the name of your water system.

3.      Fill in the level of ARSENIC that was detected in your water for the RUNNING ANNUAL AVERAGE, which was listed on the violation letter.

4.      Fill in the time period of the violation. Usually this will be the quarter and year, like 'fourth quarter of 2008.'

5.      Describe corrective actions your water system is taking and anticipated date of completion.

For example:

·       Bottled water is available at no cost to affected populations at (location).

·       We are drilling a new well to be completed by (anticipated date).

·       We are receiving technical assistance from TCEQ.

·       We are investigating the possibility of connecting to another system.

·       We plan to change the way we blend water from different sources.

·       We are installing a reverse osmosis (RO) unit or other treatment to lower the contaminant levels.

·       We have a RO unit or other treatment attached to a designated tap located at (location) for use by affected populations.

You can add any information that is factual and does not change the intent of the notice.

6.      Write in the name and phone number of your water system’s contact person.

You must provide a name and phone number for a water system representative who can provide more information about this issue to your consumers.  When appropriate, this should include a multilingual contact.

7.       Fill out the Certification of Delivery form and submit it, along with a copy of the public notification, to TCEQ at:


Public Drinking Water Section

Public Notification Program, MC-155
P.O. Box 13087
Austin, Texas 78711-3087

 





  
 
 TTHM Notice Minimize
TTHM
Mandatory Public Notification Language


The CITY OF STANTON  has been notified by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) that the water this system supplies has exceeded the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for total trihalomethanes (TTHM's), as set in the Commission's Drinking Water Standards.

The MCL for TTHM's is 0.080 milligrams per liter (mg/L).  Compliance with this level is based on a running annual average of quarterly sample results.  CITY OF STANTON's running annual average for the FIRST quarter of 2017 was 0.096 mg/L.


Trihalomethanes are a group of volatile organic compounds that are formed when chlorine, added  to the water during the treatment process for disinfection, reacts with naturally-occurring organic matter in the water.  


Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidney, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer. 


You do not need to use an alternative water supply.  However, if you have health concerns, you may want to talk to your doctor to get more information about how this may affect you.


We are working to correct the problem. The City of Stanton is in the process of combining chlorine and ammonia to minimize formation of Trihalomethanes . Ground water is also in use to help blend with surface water.


Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail. 


If you have any questions concerning this notice, you may contact JESSIE MONTEZ at 432-756-3302.                                                                                                
                                                                                                         
Posted/delivery: April 20, 2017 

TTHM
Mandatory Public Notification Language

The CITY OF STANTON  has been notified by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) that the water this system supplies has exceeded the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for total trihalomethanes (TTHM's), as set in the Commission's Drinking Water Standards.

The MCL for TTHM's is 0.080 milligrams per liter (mg/L).  Compliance with this level is based on a running annual average of quarterly sample results.  CITY OF STANTON's running annual average for the FOURTH quarter of 2016 was 0.096 mg/L.

Trihalomethanes are a group of volatile organic compounds that are formed when chlorine, added  to the water during the treatment process for disinfection, reacts with naturally-occurring organic matter in the water.  

Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidney, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer. 

You do not need to use an alternative water supply.  However, if you have health concerns, you may want to talk to your doctor to get more information about how this may affect you.

We are working to correct the problem. The City of Stanton is in the process of combining chlorine and ammonia to minimize formation of Trihalomethanes . Ground water is also in use to help blend with surface water.

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail. 

If you have any questions concerning this notice, you may contact JESSIE MONTEZ at 432-756-3302.                                                                                                       
                                                                                                            
                                                                                      
 Posted/delivery: April 20, 2017 


 
  
 
 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2016 Minimize
CCR-2016 - Friday, June 2, 2017

I certify that the community water system named above has distributed the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) for the calendar year of 2016 and that the information in the report is correct and consistent with the compliance monitoring data previously submitted to the TCEQ. Public Water Systems serving 500 or fewer persons are not required to mail the entire CCR to their customers as long as the system provides notice at least once per year by July 1 to its customers by mail, door-to-door delivery, or by posting in an appropriate location that the report is available upon request. PWS ID Number : Public Water System(PWS) Name : TCEQ CERTIFICATION of DELIVERY CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT
 
For Calendar year
TX1590001
CITY OF STANTON
2016


PWS/1590001/CO


IMPORTANT INFORMATION
For more information about your sources of water, please refer to the Source Water Assessment Viewer available at the following URL:  http://www.tceq.texas.gov/gis/swaview
The purpose of this document is to provide most of the data that you will use for your annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) for your water system.  The report below is not your Consumer Confidence Report.  In order to meet all of the requirements of Title 30, Texas Administrative Code (30 TAC), Chapter 290, Subchapter H Consumer Confidence Reports, you must follow the instructions below and review 30 TAC 290.272 Content of the Report to ensure your CCR contains all required information.
To download the data into your word processing program, follow these steps.  Remember you must have the document set up in Landscape Orientation.
    *  Choose Edit from the Menu.
    *  Choose Select All from the edit drop down MENU. (it will highlight all the information)
    *  Choose Edit from the Menu, select Copy from the edit dropdwon Menu.
    *  Open your word processing program.
    *  Choose Edit from the MENU, select Paste from the edit dropdown MENU and the information wlll transfer.
*  You are required to review the data generated in this report to ensure that it is correct and consistent with the compliance monitoring data previously submitted to TCEQ.
*  You must deliver the CCR to your customers by July 1 of every year.
*  All water systems must fill out the Certification of Delivery and mail the original Certification of Delivery and the Consumer Confidence Report to TCEQ by July 1:
   If sending by regular mail - TCEQ, PDWS MC-155 Attn CCR, PO BOX 13087, Austin, TX 78711-3087
   If sending by certified mail - TCEQ, PDWS MC-155 Attn CCR, 12100 Park 35 Circle, Austin, TX 78753
*  Systems with 500 customers or fewer are not required to direct deliver the CCR to customers.  Instead they must provide notice by July 1 to customers by mail, door-to-door delivery, or posting in an appropriate location that the report is available upon request.
*  The report must include the telephone number of the owner, operator, or designee of the community water system as a source of additional information concerning the report.
*  In communities with a large proportion of non-English speaking residents, as determined by TCEQ, the report must contain information in the appropriate language(s) regarding the importance of the report or contains a telephone number or address where such residents may contact the system to obtain a translated copy of the report and/or assistance in the appropriate language.


*  The report must include information about opportunities for public participation in decisions that may affect the quality of the water (e.g., time and place of regularly scheduled board meetings). 
*  Water systems must look up the current Source Water Assessment status in DWW by clicking on "Source Water Assessment Results" from the Water System Detail page and add one of the following four paragraphs into the CCR.  Where the text [insert name of person to contact] is displayed, you must replace it with contact information from your water system.
   i.  If at least one contaminant listed as highly susceptible, use this text:
   The TCEQ completed an assessment of your source water and results indicate that some of your sources are susceptible to certain contaminants.  The sampling requirements for your water system are based on this susceptibility and previous sample data.  Any detections of these contaminants may be found in this Consumer Confident Report.  For more information on source water assesments and protection efforts at our system, contact [insert name of person to contact]
   ii.  If no contaminants listed as highly susceptible, use this text:
   The TCEQ completed an assessment of your source water and results indicate that our sources have a low susceptibility to contaminants.  The sampling requirements for your water system are based on this susceptibility and previous sample data.  Any detections of these contaminants may be found in this Consumer Confident Report.  For more information on source water assesments and protection efforts at our system, contact [insert name of person to contact]
   iii.  If there are no source water assessment results available for the system, use this text:
   A Source Water Assessment for your drinking water source(s) is currently being conducted by the TCEQ and should be provided to us this year.  The report will describe the susceptibility and types of constituents that may come into contact with your drinking water source based on human activities and natural conditions.  The information in this assessment will allow us to focus our source water protection strategies.
   iv.  If only sources of water are purchased, use this text:
   The TCEQ has completed a Source Water Assessment for all drinking water systems that own their sources.  The report describes the susceptibility and types of constituents that may come into contact with your drinking water source based on human activities and natural conditions.    The system(s) from which we purchase our water received the assessment report.  For more information on source water assesments and protection efforts at our system, contact [insert name of person to contact]
*  If your water system is operating under a variance or exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act granted under Section 290.102(b) (4) of Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code, you must include the following:
1.  Explanation of the variance or exemption;
2.  Date the variance or exemption was issued expires;
3.  Brief explanation about the steps the system is taking to comply with the term and schedules of the variance or exemption; and
4.  Notice of any opportunity for public input on the review or renewal of the variance or exemption.
*  You must include any commonly used name and location of the body(ies) of water where your system obtains its water.  You can include this on the Source 


Water Information page on the space under Location.
*  If your water system receives water from a source that is not your own, you are required to include the current CCR year's Regulated Contaminants Detected table.  The providing system is required to give you this information by April 1 of every year.  This data should include things like SOC, MIN, MTL, VOC, 1052, 504, 515, 531.  Because you cannot test these sources of water the providing system is required to give them to you.  Systems that use an interconnect or emergency source to augment the drinking water supply during the calendar year must also include the source of water, length of time used, explanation why it was used, and whom to call for water quality information.
*  If your water system had any violations during the current CCR Calendar year, you are required to include an explanation of the corrective action take by the water system.
*  If your water system is going to use the CCR to deliver a Public Notification, you must include the full public notice and return a copy of the CCR and Public Notice with the Public Notice Certification Form.  This is in addition to the copy and certification form required by the CCR Rule.
*  The information about likely sources of contamination provided in the CCR is generic.  Specific information regarding contaminants may be available in sanitary surveys and source water assessments and should be used when available to the system.
*  If a community water system distributes water to its customers from multiple hydraulically independent distribution systems fed by different raw water sources, the table should contain a separate column for each service area, and the report should identify each separate distribution system.  Alternatively, systems may produce separate reports tailored to include data for each service area.
*  If a water system has performed any monitoring for Cryptosporidium, the report must include:  (1)  A summary of the results of any detections; and (2)  An explanation of the significance of the results.
*  For detected unregulated contaminants for which monitoring is required the table(s) must contain the average and range of concentrations at which the contaminant was detected.  The CCR only needs to include detections that were found during the year the report covers.  If there are detections the report must inlcude the following explanation:  "Unregulated contaminants are those for which the EPA has not established drinking water standards.  The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulations are warranted."
*  If you used chlorine, chloramine, chlorine dioxide or ozone in your water system you must include: (1) The chemical used, (2) Average level of quarterly data, (3) lowest result of a single sample, (4) Highest result of a single sample, (5) Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL), (6) Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG), (7) The unit of measure and (8) Source of the chemical.
*  If a water system has performed any monitoring for radon in the finished water, the report must include:  (1) The results of the monitoring; and (2) An explanation of the significance of the results.
*  If a water system has performed additional monitoring which indicates the presence of other contaminants in the finished water, TCEQ strongly encourages systems to report any results which may indicate a health concern.  To determine if results may indicate a health concern, TCEQ recommends that systems find out if EPA has proposed a National Primary Drinking Water Regulation or issued a health advisory for that contaminant by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).  TCEQ considers detects above a proposed MCL or health advisory level to indicate possible health concerns.  For such contaminants, TCEQ recommends that the report include: (1) The results of the monitoring; and (2) an explanation of the significance of the results noting the existence of a health advisory or a proposed regulation.


*  If your system received a fecal-indicator positive ground water source sample, you must inform your customers by including the following information in the CCR:
1.  The source of fecal contamination (if the source is known) and the dates of the fecal indicator-positive;
2.  Actions taken to address the fecal contamination in the goundwater source;
3.  For each fecal contamination that has not been addressed the plan approved by TCEQ and schedule for correction; and
4.  The potential health affects using language in sec290.275(3)
*  If you are a groundwater system that receives notice from a state of a significant deficiency, you must inform your customers in your CCR report of any significant deficiencies that are not corrected by December 31 of the year covered by it.  The CCR must include the following information:
1.  The nature of the significant deficiency and the date it was identified by the state.
2.  Include information regarding the State-approved plan and schedule for correction, including interim measures, progress to date, and any interim measures completed.
3.  If the significant deficiency was corrected by the end of the calendar year, include information regarding how the deficiency was corrected and the date it was corrected.
 
Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
TX1590001 CITY OF STANTON
 
Annual Water Quality Report for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2016
For more information regarding this report contact: 
This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by the water system to provide safe drinking water.
Name   ______Jessie Montez_______________________

Phone  ________432-756-3302_____________________

 
Este reporte incluye información importante sobre el agua para tomar.  Para asistencia en español, favor de llamar al telefono (432) 756-3302.
CITY OF STANTON is Purchased Surface Water

 
Sources of Drinking Water
The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
-   Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
-   Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
-   Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
-   Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
-   Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.
Contaminants may be found in drinking water that may cause taste, color, or odor problems.  These types of problems are not necessarily causes for health concerns.  For more information on taste, odor, or color of drinking water, please contact the system's business office.
You may be more vulnerable than the general population to certain microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium, in drinking water.  Infants, some elderly, or immunocompromised persons such as those undergoing chemotherapy for cancer; persons who have undergone organ transplants; those who are undergoing treatment with steroids; and people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, can be particularly at risk from infections. You should seek advice about drinking water from your physician or health care providers  Additional guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We are responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but we cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Information about Source Water Assessments

A Source Water Susceptibility Assessment for your drinking water source(s) is currently being updated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.  This information describes the susceptibility and types of constituents that may come into contact with your drinking water source based on human activities and natural conditions.  The information contained in the assessment allows us to focus source water protection strategies.

 
For more information about your sources of water, please refer to the Source Water Assessment Viewer available at the following URL:  http://gis3.tceq.state.tx.us/swav/Controller/index.jsp?wtrsrc=

 
Further details about sources and source-water assessments are available in Drinking Water Watch at the following URL:  http://dww.tceq.texas.gov/DWW
Source Water Name Type of Water Report Status Location

2 - BAPTIST CHURCH - CITY HALL BAPTIST CHURCH GW _A__32.130957/-101.792425_

3 - CITY HALL CITY HALL GW _A__32.131848/-101.791817__

6 - WTP WTP GW _A__32.125422/-101.802627

RAW SW FROM COLORADO RIVER MWD I/C WITH TX0000001 SW _A__

RAW SW FROM CRMWD RAW SW _____A___

2016 Regulated Contaminants Detected
 
Lead and Copper
Definitions:  
Action Level Goal (ALG):  The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  ALGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level:  The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Lead and Copper Date Sampled MCLG Action Level (AL) 90th Percentile # Sites Over AL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination

Copper 08/21/2014 1.3 1.3                                     0.13 0 ppm       N Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosion of household plumbing systems.

Lead 08/21/2014 0 15                                       1.4 0 ppb       N Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.
 

Water Quality Test Results
Definitions:   The following tables contain scientific terms and measures, some of which may require explanation.

Avg:   Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average of monthly samples.

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.


Level 1 Assessment: A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.


Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.


Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.


Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.


MFL million fibers per liter (a measure of asbestos)

na:   not applicable.

Water Quality Test Results
mrem: millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)

NTU nephelometric turbidity units (a measure of turbidity)

pCi/L picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)

ppb:   micrograms per liter or parts per billion - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

ppm:   milligrams per liter or parts per million - or one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.

Treatment Technique or TT: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

ppt parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter (ng/L)

ppq parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter (pg/L)
  
Regulated Contaminants
Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) 2016 25 0 - 32.9 No goal for the total 60                                       ppb       N By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) 2016 79 0 - 139 No goal for the total 80                                       ppb       Y By-product of drinking water disinfection.

Inorganic Contaminants Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination

Antimony 2016 0.31 0.23 - 0.31 6 6                                       ppb       N Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder; test addition.

Arsenic - While your drinking water meets EPA standards for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. EPAs standard balances the current understanding of arsenics possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems. 2016 10 6.4 - 13.3 0 10                                       ppb       N Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.


Barium 2016 0.13 0.074 - 0.13 2 2                                       ppm       N Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.

Chromium 2016 1.4 1.4 - 1.4 100 100                                     ppb       N Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits.
 

Cyanide 2016 103 103 - 103 200 200                                     ppb       N Discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories; Discharge from steel/metal factories.

Fluoride 2016 0.8 0.789 - 1.28 4 4.0                                     ppm       N Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Nitrate [measured as Nitrogen] - Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider. 2016 8 1.86 - 8.06 10 10                                       ppm       N Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.


Nitrite [measured as Nitrogen] 10/21/2015 0.264 0.264 - 0.264 1 1                                       ppm       N Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Selenium 2016 10 5.7 - 11 50 50                                       ppb       N Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from mines.

Radioactive Contaminants Collection Date Highest Level Detected Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL Units Violation Likely Source of Contamination

Beta/photon emitters 2016 12.7 11.8 - 12.7 0 50                                       pCi/L*   N Decay of natural and man-made deposits.
*EPA considers 50 pCi/L to be the level of concern for beta particles.
Gross alpha excluding radon and uranium 2016 4.8 0 - 4.8 0 15    pCi/L     N Erosion of natural deposits.

Uranium 2016 5.9 5.1 - 5.9 0 30  ug/l     N Erosion of natural deposits.
  
Turbidity
Limit (Treatment Technique) Level Detected Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Highest single measurement 1 NTU       0.3 NTU           N Soil runoff.
Lowest monthly % meeting limit 0.3 NTU     100%               N Soil runoff.
 
Information Statement:  Turbidity is a measurement of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles.  We monitor it because it is a good indicator of water quality and the effectiveness of our filtration 

Total Organic Carbon
The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set, unless a TOC violation is noted in the violations section.

 Violations Table
E. coli
Fecal coliforms and E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, and people with severely compromised immune systems.
Violation Type Violation Begin Violation End Violation Explanation
MONITOR GWR TRIGGERED/ADDITIONAL, MAJOR 08/01/2014 2016 We failed to collect follow-up samples within 24 hours of learning of the total coliform-positive sample. These needed to be tested for fecal indicators from all sources that were being used at the time the positive sample was collected.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)
Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.
Violation Type Violation Begin Violation End Violation Explanation
MCL, LRAA 07/01/2016 09/30/2016 Water samples showed that the amount of this contaminant in our drinking water was above its standard (called a maximum contaminant level and abbreviated MCL) for the period indicated.
MCL, LRAA 10/01/2016 12/31/2016 Water samples showed that the amount of this contaminant in our drinking water was above its standard (called a maximum contaminant level and abbreviated MCL) for the period indicated.

 
Year Disinfection Average
Level Minimum
Level Maximum
Level MRDL                                       MRDLG     Unit of
measure Source of Chemical
2016 Chloramine 1.72 1.02 2.7 4.0 4.0 ppm Disinfectant used to control microbes.  If at least one contaminant listed as highly susceptible, use this text:
   The TCEQ completed an assessment of your source water and results indicate that some of your sources are susceptible to certain contaminants.  The sampling requirements for your water system are based on this susceptibility and previous sample data.  Any detections of these contaminants may be found in this Consumer Confident Report.  For more information on source water assessments and protection efforts at our system, contact [JESSIE MONTEZ 432-756-3302] 

System Susceptibility Summary
Asbestos Cyanide Metals Microbial Minerals Radiochemical Sythetic Organic Chemicals Disinfection Byproduct Volatile Organic Chemicals Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate Other
MEDIUM MEDIUM HIGH MEDIUM HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH MEDIUM

Entry Point Susceptibility Summary
Entry Point ID Asbestos Cyanide Metals Microbial Minerals Radiochem Sythetic Organic Chemicals Disinfection Byproduct Volatile Organic Chemicals Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate Other
001 LOW LOW HIGH MEDIUM HIGH HIGH HIGH LOW HIGH HIGH MEDIUM

 
  
 
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